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  1. #11

    Re: Handling a 60-70 ft Hatteras Motoryacht

    Tried to edit this thread's first post to get rid of the extra characters, but I couldn't. It's probably possible but after a few days of fooling with it, I've just left it in as original.

    As to the original question, I too have never owned a boat that big. It seems a general rule that with bigger boats, things occur more slowly, but as noted you don't want any part of your body between the boat and anything else.

    All of us learned to handle large boats, by doing it, but it seems to me that the process takes quite a bit of time on the water to learn- and if you're good, you never stop learning.
    Last edited by jim rosenthal; 06-11-2019 at 09:38 AM.

  2. #12

    Re: Handling a 60-70 ft Hatteras Motoryacht

    A few more comments on my earlier reply.

    I donít find that a larger MY in the 70í range, even 80í is that much different from a 50 foooter. You re not going to manually pull a 50 footer against a 15kts wind or 1 kt current unless you re in your 20s

    Planning is critical as Tim mentioned, especially line sequence both coming in and leaving a slip or dock. As a rule, at transient docks we always double up the lines before leaving so lines can be untied from the boat, not from the dock.

    The one thing which gets a little tricky with larger boats, especially at first, is how much torque you get out of the big wheels and how quickly you will build momentum. The key is not to leave the engines in gear for more a second or so before getting back in N and in gear again. I donít think it takes more than 2 seconds in gear to move a larger boat in or out of a slip. Certainly spends more time in N than in gear.

    Tim also has a point about the effect of power on pilings and dock cleats. Larger boats, larger engines, larger wheels can put a lot of stress of pilings and cleats and you have to be careful. Again, short time in gear and back to neutral is critical. You can not allow momentum to build. , on the 84 I run ( twin 1650hp C32s) I rarely leave an engine in gear for more than a second while docking). If springing it is even even less...

    But again as explained in first reply, the easy access to lines on a MY, especially Hartís with side doors, make it a lot easier to singlenhand than a SF

    As to training, someone with limited experience will need, and be required, to get extensive training with a captain and build some sea time before being able to run the boat alone. That will include getting to know the boat and systems to address possible issues. Learning on your own boat is probably more efficient than renting smaller boats without supervision and training

    And finally, you have to know your limits. If you re short handed and it s blowing... just donít go. The root of most incidents is usually a bad go- no go decision
    Pascal
    Miami, FL
    1970 53 MY #325 Cummins 6CTAs
    2014 26' gaff rigged sloop
    2007 Sandbarhopper 13
    12' Westphal Cat boat

  3. #13

    Re: Handling a 60-70 ft Hatteras Motoryacht

    I will concur with the foregoing (as an operator of a boat measuring 61') with a caveat. In the case of a current running off the dock (25+/- degrees where I'm docked), a spring line with one motor in gear is often essential. And then there's the wind. As mentioned, momentum is critical. What works for me is easing onto a spring making it taut and then leaving the inside motor in gear with some rudder to pin the boat to the dock. At peak current with an off-the-dock wind, I may have to bump up the power just a bit even with the rudder hard over to get the stern in tight.

    I'll tell you that I vividly recall handling a stern line on a trawler years ago when it tried to drive its way onto the dock with too much power. The dock cleat broke away and hit the boat something fierce. I remember the guy on the stern just went inside. He'd had enough.

    I think if you take it slow, you can tell when a cleat or a line is not going to take the strain. And I think you sometimes see docks with really small cleats that spell trouble. Acquired taste maybe.
    Semper Siesta
    Robert Clarkson
    ASLAN, 1983 55C #343
    Charleston, SC

  4. #14

    Re: Handling a 60-70 ft Hatteras Motoryacht

    Pascal and Robert both made some excellent points. I respect both captain's ability and judgement
    and I would add that if in doubt don't try it without help. A possible answer would be to have bow and
    stern thrusters sized large enough to be effective under the conditions mentioned in the last two posts.
    Keeping a cool head is absolutely necessary in any case. Panicking and shouting orders just adds to the
    stress factor.

    Walt

  5. #15

    Re: Handling a 60-70 ft Hatteras Motoryacht

    I appreciate you guys sharing all this.

  6. #16

    Re: Handling a 60-70 ft Hatteras Motoryacht

    Lots of great responses here. I wouldn't the abundance of caution discourage you. Once you are insured, you are free to learn how to drive your boat. You can have an experienced captain familiar with the type of boat give you instruction. (I needed this when I bought a boat and it was tremendously helpful).

    Once you become familiar, you may find that you can quite easily single hand the boat but it will always get hairy upon arrival because you just don't know what to expect and it's always helpful to have a hand with ropes. I have single handed my 54' sport fish many times. If you call ahead to your destination, you can arrange to have somebody to help with lines.

    I agree with all of the comments regarding the benefits of extra hands on board. There are many. At least one good helper.

    It will take lots of time as an owner to become familiar with the many systems on your boat. This, over time will make you a better captain. You might find that many little things are malfunctioning. It will take some time to find the easy solutions to these many little problems.

  7. #17

    Re: Handling a 60-70 ft Hatteras Motoryacht

    The majority of these answers are spot on. I noticed that you did not include what previous boating experience you have, regardless, it is a large learning curve but not insurmountable. One key point that was mentioned is having able bodied help, it will be difficult for you to learn to berth your vessel without you and your captain at the controls which means at least one other person is handling lines. I have had quite a few clients in the last couple years make the move from center console type boats into mid 50 foot cruisers and it seems to take on average a good 8 to10 hrs across a couple weekends for the majority to get the nack of docking in good weather. For some people it is much more intuitive, but all need time to,learn and practice. Good luck to you in this endeavor !
    Capt' Hoop (Master 100 Ton/towing)
    1978- 58 MY Soo Easy
    2001- 60C Noah's Ark

  8. #18

    Re: Handling a 60-70 ft Hatteras Motoryacht

    Quote Originally Posted by hoop1013 View Post
    The majority of these answers are spot on. I noticed that you did not include what previous boating experience you have, regardless, it is a large learning curve but not insurmountable. One key point that was mentioned is having able bodied help, it will be difficult for you to learn to berth your vessel without you and your captain at the controls which means at least one other person is handling lines. I have had quite a few clients in the last couple years make the move from center console type boats into mid 50 foot cruisers and it seems to take on average a good 8 to10 hrs across a couple weekends for the majority to get the nack of docking in good weather. For some people it is much more intuitive, but all need time to,learn and practice. Good luck to you in this endeavor !

    A lot of small boat experience and a several hundred hours of running a 63 foot house boat on a lake. So I will rank myself as a true beginner. I hate to have to buy a smaller boat 53' and wish I had a 63'. I did the steps with aircraft so I can do it with boats as well but I wanted to get some input on handling a big boat.

    The wife had a blow to her head in March and is having to work on her balance and speech with therapy. She will probably heal and be able to help in time and I will not be buying a boat until she has recovered to a point I feel comfortable with her.

    The ultimate goal is a poling skiff on top as the dingy and chasing bone fish in the Bahamas.

    I am very grateful for all the advice.

  9. #19

    Re: Handling a 60-70 ft Hatteras Motoryacht

    If you can handle a houseboat, a Hatteras MY will be a piece of cake.
    Pascal
    Miami, FL
    1970 53 MY #325 Cummins 6CTAs
    2014 26' gaff rigged sloop
    2007 Sandbarhopper 13
    12' Westphal Cat boat

  10. #20

    Re: Handling a 60-70 ft Hatteras Motoryacht

    Quote Originally Posted by Pascal View Post
    If you can handle a houseboat, a Hatteras MY will be a piece of cake.

    The houseboat was a handful with a lite breeze but I was not fighting the current that you get in the inter coastal waterway and the wind.

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